Department of English & Fine Arts Courses and Major

THE ENGLISH MAJOR AT A GLANCE: You study at the Air Force Academy to become a leader in our nation's military. Outstanding leadership starts with effective communication. That's exactly what you'll learn as an English major. Leaders throughout history have used their skills as readers, thinkers, and communicators to change the world. This is the essence of the English major. You will focus on literature, imagination, and communication as deliberate human endeavors. You'll explore the most perplexing questions of the human condition: What does it mean to be human? What is the source of our greatness and our depravity, our nobility and our pathos? For what ideals and against what forces must we fight? How will you persuade others, especially those you lead? How will you help them understand? The ultimate goal of the warrior-scholar is wisdom--a vision that transcends the ephemeral and the superfluous. The study of literature and communication offers the wisdom of generations to a new generation of leaders: you.

What is the curriculum like for an English major? The courses you study as an English major reflect a combination of the rigorous traditions of the discipline and your personal interests. The program is extremely flexible, allowing you to explore the literature and ideas that excite your curiosity. You will be able to pattern a curriculum suited to your desires--one that's sure to enrich your intellectual life. For those cadets who show outstanding potential, research grants for work at civilian institutions are available, as well as opportunities to present papers at professional conferences and to have research published.

Who should you talk to about the English major? If you enjoy reading, thinking, and communicating, the English major is for you. Your studies as an English major will give you practical training in leadership. Great literature provides examples of human value systems and human relations--occasions for you to experience and appreciate the art of dealing with people before you receive your commission in the Air Force.

 

ENGLISH COURSES

English 111. Introductory Composition and Research. 3(1). Teaches the fundamentals of sound writing and rhetorical practices. Introduces students to methods and resources for academic research. Provides instruction and practice in the presentation, integration, and documentation of researched material. Establishes the foundation for analytical thinking through frequent reading and writing assignments. Prereq: None. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 211. Literature and Intermediate Composition. 3(1). Refines the analytical and critical reading skills introduced in English 111 through examination of significant literary texts. Course objectives include acquiring skills in analytical and argumentative writing, research methods and documentation, critical reading, and effective oral communication. Written assignments and class exercises incorporate analysis and research and provide a foundation for communication skills advanced in English 411. Midterm explication paper and final research essay. All fourthclass cadets who have validated or received transfer credit for English 111 should enroll in English 211 at their earliest opportunity. Final paper. Prereq: English 111. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 340. Technical Writing and Communication. 3(1). Covers the principles of organizing, developing, and writing technical information. Teaches the technical writing conventions such as headings, illustrations, style, rhetorical patterns, and tone common to scientific and technical disciplines. Considers how cyberspace effects communication practices and how today’s leaders use and present technical information to accomplish the mission. Builds skills in critical thinking, writing, research, and document design. Final project. Prereq: English 111. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 341. Literary Criticism. 3(l). Introduces the theory and practice of literary criticism. Concentrates on major critical approaches, applying them to representative literature and showing how they lead the reader to deeper understanding and satisfaction from the work of art. Final exam or final paper. Prereq: English 111. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 342. American Literature: Introduction. 3(1). An introduction to American fiction, poetry, drama, and prose. Representative authors might include Bradstreet, Melville, Dickinson, Douglass, Twain, Faulkner, Hemingway, and Morrison. Final exam. Prereq: English 111 or equivalent. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 343. British Literature I: Beginnings to Romanticism. 3(1). A survey of English poetry, drama, and prose of such authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Swift, Fielding, and Johnson. Final exam. Prereq: English 111. Sem hrs: 3 fall.

English 344. British Literature II: Romanticism to the Present. 3(1). A survey of later English literature focusing on Romantic poetry, Victorian prose and poetry, and the Modern novels. Works are by such authors as Byron, Shelley, Austen, Bronte, Dickens, Hardy, Conrad, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Lawrence, and Fowles. Final exam. Prereq: English 111. English343 recommended prior to 344. Sem hrs: 3 spring.

English 353. Shakespeare. 3(1). Intensive study of Shakespeare's poetry and major plays within the cultural and historical perspectives of Renaissance England. Cadets attend a stage production of one play when available. Designed for cadets in any major. Final exam. Prereq: English 111. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 360. Classical Masterpieces. 3(l). A study of influential genres of the Classical tradition, including epic, drama, and history. Authors have included Homer, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Virgil, Tacitus, and Dante. Key concepts to be studied include the role of the hero, the nature of political institutions, and the relationship between humans and the divine--in short, the foundations in Greek, Roman and Medieval European culture. Final exam or paper. Prereq: English 111. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 375. Creative Writing. 3(l). Examines techniques of creative writing. In a workshop atmosphere, students experiment with writing, focusing generally on a specific form such as the short story, personal essay, or poetry. The student's own work becomes the focus of discussion and attention. Final project. Prereq: None. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 380. Topics in Race, Gender, Class, and Culture. 3(1). Topics in literature, communication theory, linguistics, and rhetoric. The course explores issues relating to class, gender, and culture, including international and interdisciplinary topics. Emphasis changes each offering, but may focus on the literature of women, the rhetoric of class, the impact of culture on linguistics, minority writers in the Americas, or African-American influence on American culture. Seminar approach. Final exam or final paper. Prereq: English 211. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 383. Literature and Science. 3(l). This course considers the interrelationships among science, technology, and literature. Topics vary by semester. Final project. Prereq: English 211. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 385. Contemporary Literature. 3(1). A seminar approach study of literature written in the present and recent past—within the lifetimes of students enrolled in the course. Several genres may be offered: novels, short fiction, poetry, memoir, personal essay, creative nonfiction, story-cycles, etc. Final project. Prereq: English 211. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 390. Junior English Seminar. 3(1). A focused survey course, taught seminar style that examines a literary period through a literary genre or representative authors. Possible examples are “Medieval Literature,” “Nineteenth-Century American Novel,” “Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature,” “History of the English Language,” or “Modernism.” Possible literary genres may include satire, short story, novel, lyric poetry, epic poetry, drama, political essay, creative non-fiction, biography, and memoir. Final paper. Prereq: English 341. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 411. Language, Literature, and Leadership: Advanced Writing & Speaking. 3(1). Building on English 111 and English 211, this capstone course focuses on the moral and intellectual aspects of war as expressed in the literature of our profession: biographical, autobiographical, and fictional accounts, along with the oratory of prominent public figures in times of national crisis. Rigorous written and oral assignments give cadets the opportunity to reflect on the inviolable bond that unites successful leadership with its moral, intellectual, and emotional foundations. The text list comprises major canonical works of fiction, memoir, and oratory that address the concreteness and complexity of war as well as the ethical issues of leadership. Prereq: English 211 or Hum 200. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 411FX. Language, Literature, and Leadership: Advanced Writing & Speaking for French Language Exchange Cadets. 3(1). Building on English 111 and English 211, this capstone course focuses on the moral and intellectual aspects of war as expressed in the literature of our profession: biographical, autobiographical, and fictional accounts, along with the oratory of prominent public figures in times of national crisis. Rigorous written and oral assignments give cadets the opportunity to reflect on the inviolable bond that unites successful command with its moral, intellectual, and emotional foundations. This course is designed for participants in the exchange programs in France and Canada. Texts in the course are from major canonical works of fiction, memoir, and oratory that address the concreteness and complexity of war as well as the ethical issues of leadership, as well as the language of diplomacy and international relations. Prereq: English 211 or Hum 200; selection for one of the two French language exchange programs. Sem hrs: 3 summer.

English 465. Television News: Production and Performance. 3(2). Examines and uses the fundamentals of television production including: directing, writing, and operating the various pieces of equipment necessary for producing television programs. Students produce, write, direct, and perform in the weekly "Blue Tube" program broadcast via closed-circuit television to the Academy community. Lab work stresses understanding basic television production fundamentals, public speaking skills, and how to use the electronic technology to communicate to a mass audience. Additionally, students will hone critical analysis skills by completing a 4-6 page paper examining their motivation for entering the profession of arms. Final paper. Prereq: C3C standing and Course Director approval. With DFENG Department Head approval, English 465 is a core substitute for English 411 to students who earn a B avg in English 111 and English 211 or ≥ B in English 211 if they validated/transferred English 111. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 474. Speech Communication: Theory and Practice. 3(l). Considers selected topics in advanced speech communication through informative and persuasive speaking. Frequent speaking assignments. Prereq: English 211. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 484. Literature of War. 3(1). From time immemorial, war and art have reflected on another. Is is the goal of this course to illuminate that intersection. Several genres may be studied: fiction, memoir, poetry, film, journalism, documentaries, speeches delivered by leaders in times of national crises, etc. English 484 is a core substitute for English 411 for English majors. Final paper. Prereq: English 211, English 341, or Hum 200. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 490. Senior English Seminar. 3(l). An intensive seminar covering a literary period, literary genre, or major author. Representative examples are "Coleridge and His Contemporaries," "The Victorian Age," and "American Literature Between the World Wars." Examples of literary genre include satire, short story novel, lyric poem, and drama. Representative examples of major authors are Milton, Chaucer, Hawthorne, Hemingway,Hurston, and O’Brien. Final paper. Prereq: English 341 and C1C standing or approval of Department Head. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 495. Special topics. 3(1). Selected topics in English. Previous topics have included “The Short Story,” “Studies in the Gothic,” “New Journalism,” “The Theatre of the Absurd,” and “Travel Writing and the Modern Imagination.” Final exam or final paper. Prereq: English 111. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

English 499. Independent Study. 3(0). Study and research in literature, composition, or creative writing for students who have demonstrated their ability for advanced study in regularly offered enrichment courses and for whom an appropriate enrichment course does not exist. Topics and meetings arranged with the instructor. Final report. Prereq: Department approval. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

FINE ARTS COURSES

Fine Art 352. Art in History. 3(1). A selected survey of world art from antiquity to the present. Includes study of the major periods, schools, and styles of art, as well as biographies of important artists. Students will apply various methods of studying major masterpieces across time, geography, and cultures. Final project or final exam. Prereq: None. Sem hrs: 3 fall.

Fine Art 358. Music Appreciation. 3(1). Survey of music in the Western world and a study of basic elements, forms, and styles in representative works by major composers. Emphasis on listening, understanding, and appreciation. Knowledge or talent in music is not required. Final exam or final project. Prereq: None. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

Fine Art 359. Introduction to Drawing and Design. 3(1). This course is the first for students with no practical art experience such as previous high school drawing experience, private lessons, or keeping a sketchbook. Students with this experience level could consider enrolling in Fine Art 464, Painting and Printmaking, offered spring semesters. Students who need help assessing their skill level should obtain instructor guidance prior to enrolling in the course. Course assignments include hands-on class exercises that teach students to apply the principles of design to common design and drawing tasks. Students will gain practical experience in sketching still life, landscape, and figurative subjects as well as imaginative and creative drawings of their own choice. Students are expected to devote time outside of class practicing skills learned during class time. Final project or final exam. Prereq: None. Sem hrs: 3 fall.

Fine Art 375. Introduction to Film Studies. 3(1). A structured introduction to cinema and/or cinema history. Course will take a thematic or chronological approach to the study of film as an art form, with attention to developing an understanding of film grammar, terminology, narration, forms of genre, and modes of production. This course will also include a critical component introducing students to many of the central theoretical ideas about cinema that have dominated the field of film studies since the 1950s. Each film is viewed outside of class before it is discussed. Final paper or final project. Prereq: English 211. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

Fine Art 464. Painting and Printmaking. 3(1). A course in painting with acrylics and watercolor media. Beginners are welcome but must be confident with basic drawing skills for still life, landscape, and figurative subjects. Students plan several paintings of their own design and also projects designed to demonstrate a variety of techniques, approaches, and styles in art. Students also complete several printmaking projects. Because the course is production-driven, students must expect to spend time outside of class—at least one hour for every hour spent in class. Students are expected to be challenged commensurate with their specific skills and abilities; every class period allows for individual instruction and guidance for success. Final project. Prereq: Fine Art 359 (Final “B” or above grade) or previous drawing experience and course director or Department Head approval. Sem hrs: 3 spring.

Fine Art 495. Special Topics. 3(1). Selected special topics in Fine Art. Final exam or final report. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.

Fine Art 499. Independent Study. 3(0). Independent study in art or music. Subject and meetings

 

For more information, contact the English Department at (719) 333-3930.

 

 

 

U.S. Air Force Academy, USAFA, CO 80840, (719) 333-1110 DSN: 333-1110, Updated: 30 Aug 14
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