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Department of Aeronautics

Aeronautical Engineering

Program

 

The USAFA Aeronautical Engineering program is among the most effective and productive learning experiences in undergraduate education.  Regarded both nationally and internationally, USAFA Aeronautics provides a rare mix of world-class courses, facilities, and instructors.  Supplemented by high-impact opportunities for cadet-centered, real-world developmental research, the USAFA Aeronautics program provides one of the finest undergraduate aeronautics educations available.

Click below to see a copy of our Aeronautical Engineering Major Brochure:

USAFA Aero Engineering Course Requirements

Aeronautical Engineering Program Enrollment and Degree Data

Aeronautical Major Program Flowchart with Prerequisites

Program Educational Objectives and Student Outcomes:
Through its courses and activities, the USAFA Aeronautics program attempts to meet certain Program Education Objectives and Student Outcomes, listed in the table below. These are reviewed periodically by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Term

Description

Program Educational Objectives

(PEOs)

Definition: To ensure the success of our graduates, we prepare them to attain Program Educational Objectives two to five years after graduation.

These are:

1) Recognition as successful Air Force officers through demonstration of their ability to:
a. Rapidly acquire required knowledge.
b. Lead others effectively.
c. Effectively apply ethical and moral standards.
d. Improve unit performance by application of organizational skills.
e. Make sound decisions based on critical thinking.
f. Communicate effectively.

2) Selection for career training on, or ahead of, schedule, and for a progression of assignments of increasing responsibility.
3) A demonstrated ability to solve Air Force technical problems.
4) Success in continuing education.

Student Outcomes (SOs)

Definition: The educational knowledge, skills, and capabilities desired in the cadets specializing in Aeronautical Engineering.

(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
(d) an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
(g) an ability to communicate effectively
(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:

Descriptions of the courses to be offered during the next academic year are listed here by subject in order. Course numbers have a general meaning. The first digit of a course number normally indicates the class year for which the course is designed: 100 series for the freshman year, 200 series for the sophomore year, 300 series for the junior year, and 400 series for the senior year.

Aero Engr 210- Fundamentals of Aeronautics. 3(1). Introduction to aircraft design, fluid mechanics, airfoil and wing aerodynamics, steady and accelerated aircraft performance, with special emphasis on computer programming using Mat Lab. Interdisciplinary design synthesis, analysis, and decision-making (including economic, political, and other non-technical considerations) of an aircraft to meet a contemporary requirement. This course is intended for cadets who have declared or are considering declaring the major in Aero Engr or Systems Engineering with an Aero Engr option. Final exam. Prereq: Comp Sci 110 and Engr Mech 220 or DFAN Department Head approval. Sem hrs: 3 fall or spring.
In addition, this course/program is a primary contributor to the development and assessment of the following USAFA outcomes:
Skills: Quantitative Literacy, Oral Communication, Decision Making
Knowledge: Heritage and Application of Air, Space, and Cyberspace Power; Principles of Engineering and Application of Technology

Aero Engr 241
AeroThermodynamics - Fundamentals of the 1 st and 2 nd laws of thermodynamics applied to systems and control volumes. Foundations in heat transfer. Control volume approaches to the equations of motion of a fluid. Applications of gas dynamics to incompressible and compressible flows through nozzles, diffusers, and turbomachinery. Isentropic flows to include Prandtl Meyer expansions, and nonisentropic flows to include normal and oblique shocks, and flows with simple friction and heat transfer. Foundations in engineering problem solving. Final exam.  Prereq: Physics 110.
Sem hrs: 3 Spring.
In addition, this course/program is a primary contributor to the development and assessment of the following USAFA outcomes:
Skills: Information Literacy

Aero Engr 315
Fundamentals of Aeronautics - Introduction to aircraft design, fluid mechanics, airfoil and wing aerodynamics, steady and accelerated aircraft performance, and stability and control. Interdisciplinary design synthesis, analysis, and decision making (including economic, political, and other nontechnical considerations) of an aircraft to meet a contemporary requirement. Final exam. Prereq: Comp Sci 110 and Engr Mech 220. Sem hrs: 3 Fall or Spring.
In addition, this course/program is a primary contributor to the development and assessment of the following USAFA outcomes: Skills: Quantitative Literacy, Oral Communication, Decision Making Knowledge: Heritage and Application of Air, Space, and Cyberspace Power; Principles of Engineering and Application of Technology

Aero Engr 315Z
Fundamentals of Aeronautics – French language section. Section taught
in French; available for students qualified for Aero Engr 315 and having successfully completed or validated French 321; counts as a course for the French Language Minor and for a major’s foreign language requirement. Requires DFF approval. Final exam. Prereq: Comp Sci 110 and Engr Mech 220. Sem hrs: 3 Fall or Spring.
In addition, this course/program is a primary contributor to the development and assessment of the following USAFA outcomes: Skills: Quantitative Literacy, Oral Communication, Decision Making Knowledge: Heritage and Application of Air, Space, and Cyberspace Power; Principles of Engineering and Application of Technology

Aero Engr 341
Aeronautical Fluid Dynamics - Fluid properties, the basic equations of motion: the continuity equation, conservation of linear momentum, and conservation of energy 202 (both the differential and the integral forms). Use of the integral momentum equation to experimentally determine the drag acting on a cylinder in a low speed stream; spreadsheet computation of unsteady Poiseuille flow; spreadsheet computation of a steady, laminar boundary layer; turbulent boundary layer experiment. Stream functions. Potential functions. Final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 241. Coreq: Math 346. Sem hrs: 3 Fall.

Aero Engr 342
Computational Aerodynamics - This course covers the theory and application of modern computational tools used to predict fluid flows around basic and complex geometries. The course is intended to give the student the necessary knowledge to choose the  relevant computational tool and perform independent computational analysis of moderately complex geometries. The course will cover grid generation, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) solvers, and post-processing using state-of-the-art tools, as well as computational potential methods such as panel codes or vortex lattice codes. The course is project oriented and explores the important concepts of temporal and spatial resolution, stability and convergence, and flowfield analysis. Final project or final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 341 and Math 346. Sem hrs: 3 Spring.

Aero Engr 351
Aircraft Performance and Static Stability - Aircraft force, moment and response definition in various coordinate systems. Takeoff and landing, cruise, climbs, turns and other accelerated performance by both analytic and numerical methods. Static stability and control and related aircraft design considerations. Design project. Final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 315 and Math 245. Sem hrs: 3 Fall.

Aero Engr 352
Aircraft Dynamic Stability and Control - Aircraft equations of motion.
Examination of aircraft dynamic modes based on both limited and full degree of freedom models utilizing analytical and numerical methods. Aircraft design considerations. Determination and evaluation of aircraft flying qualities against military specifications. Application of control system theory to the design of aircraft stability augmentation systems and autopilots. Control system design project. Final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 351 and Engr Mech 320. Sem hrs: 3 Spring.

Aero Engr 361
Propulsion I - Introduction to Brayton and jet engine cycles. Application of aerothermodynamics to aircraft jet engines and major engine components. Overview of the design, performance, and applications of turboprops/shafts, turbofans, turbojets, ramjets, and scramjets. Focus on preliminary cycle analysis of aircraft gas turbine engines to include mission analysis, parametric cycle analysis, and engine performance analysis. Introduction to performance and operating principles of solid and liquid rocket engines. Lab. Design project. Final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 241 or department permission. Sem hrs: 3 Spring.

Aero Engr 436
Aeroelasticity - Aeroelastic phenomena of an aircraft in flight. Dyamic pressure, Mach and angle of attack effects on the bending and twisting of aircraft components. Aeroelastic equations and coefficients related to flight characteristics such as flutter and divergence. Design project and/or final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 315 and Engr Mech 330. Coreq: Engr Mech 320. Sem hrs: 3 Spring. 203

Aero Engr 442
Aerodynamics - Analytical and numerical solution techniques applied to incompressible, compressible, transonic, and supersonic flight regimes over airfoils, wings, and bodies. Introduction to hypersonic aerodynamics. Techniques include those historically used in incompressible flow up to and including state-of-the-art supersonic solutions using high speed computers. Final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 342. Sem hrs: 3 Fall. Aero Engr 446. Introduction to Hypersonics. Analysis of heat transfer and high temperature effects on hypersonic vehicles. Application to reentry and transatmospheric vehicles. Final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 341. Sem hrs: 3 Fall or Spring.

Aero Engr 447
Advanced Applied Aerodynamics - Advanced topics in steady and unsteady aerodynamics in all speed ranges are considered for study by analytical, experimental and computational methods. Final exam or final project. Coreq: Aero Engr 442. Sem hrs: 3 Fall or Spring.

Aero Engr 456
Flight Test Techniques - Fundamental flight test methods for defining performance and flying qualities characteristics of fixed wing aircraft. Patterned after the Flight Test Engineer’s Course at the USAF Test Pilot School. Students fly in designated aircraft to obtain flight test data. Final project or final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 351 and department permission. Sem hrs: 3 Fall or Spring.

Aero Engr 456L
Flight Test Techniques Laboratory - Application of fundamental flight test methods for defining the performance and flying qualities characteristics of high performance fixed wing aircraft. This laboratory experience serves as a final project for Aero Engr 456, Flight Test Techniques. Students receive credit for this course by participating in a field trip to Edwards AFB, flight test sortie in a high performance aircraft, creation of a written report, and presentation of a final briefing. This course will be scheduled during the same class period as Aero Engr 456. Coreq: Aero Engr 456 and department permission. Sem hrs: 1 Fall or Spring.

Aero Engr 457
Aircraft Feedback Control Systems - Design and analysis of aircraft stability augmentation and automatic flight control systems by classical root locus and frequency domain techniques. Introduction to digital system analysis. Analytical and numerical methods complemented with aircraft simulation. Final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 352. Sem hrs: 3 Fall or Spring.

Aero Engr 466
Propulsion II - Analysis of advanced aircraft engines. Preliminary aerodynamic and structural design of major engine components including inlets, compressors, combustors, turbines, mixers, afterburners, and nozzles. Final exam. Prereq: Aero Engr 361. Sem hrs: 3 Fall.

Aero Engr 471
Aeronautics Laboratory - Introduction to experimental methods and techniques. Introduction to instrumentation and data acquisition systems. Statistical analysis of data. Selected experiments in the fields of aerodynamics, gas dynamics, propulsion, and flight mechanics. Labs. Final report. Prereq: Aero Engr 341 and El Engr 231. Coreq: Math 356. Sem hrs: 3 Fall or Spring. 204

Aero Engr 481
Introduction to Aircraft and Propulsion System Design - Fundamentals of aircraft and propulsion system design taught using a systems engineering approach. Aerodynamic design and drag prediction. Parameter effects on constraint analyses and preliminary weight estimation. Configuration optimization. Conceptual layout and preliminary analysis of aircraft structures. Factor and margin of safety. Material selection including strength, stiffness, weight, and cost considerations. Introduction to propulsion system design and selection criteria. Safety, reliability, maintainability, schedule and cost management concerns are addressed during the course. Final report. Prereq: Aero Engr 341 and Aero Engr 351. Coreq: Engr Mech 330 and Aero Engr 361. Sem hrs: 3 Fall.

Aero Engr 482
Aircraft Design - Design of an aircraft using a systems engineering approach to meet specifications provided. Detailed configuration optimization, aerodynamic analysis, structural layout, material selection, and structural component sizing, weight and center of gravity analysis, and stability and control analysis. Safety, reliability, maintainability, schedule, and cost management concerns are addressed during the course. Final report. Prereq: Aero Engr 352, Aero Engr 481, and Aero Engr 342 (or department permission). Sem hrs: 3 Spring.

Aero Engr 483
Aircraft Engine Design - Preliminary design of an aircraft engine to meet specified performance requirements. Cycle selection, installation effects, and engine sizing. Determination of installed and uninstalled performance of selected and sized engine. Preliminary design of major engine components to include variable geometry inlets, fans, compressor, main burner, turbine, afterburner, and exhaust nozzles. Material selection for each component is accomplished based on criteria such as the stress and temperature environments, manufacturability, radar absorption capability, weight, and cost. Safety, reliability and maintainability concerns during the design process are addressed throughout the course. This course will include, if possible, a voluntary field trip to a government/industry design facility. Final report. Prereq: Aero Engr 466 and Aero Engr 481. Sem hrs: 3 Spring.

Aero Engr 495
Special Topics - Selected topics in aeronautical engineering. Final exam or final report. Prereq: Department permission. Sem hrs: 13 Fall or Spring.

Aero Engr 499
Independent Study - Individual study and research supervised by a faculty member. Topic established with the department head. Final report. Prereq: Department permission. Sem hrs: 3 Fall or Spring. Aero Engr 499A. Independent Study. 2(0). Sem hrs: 2 Fall or Spring. Aero Engr 499B Independent Study - Sem hrs: 1.5 Fall or Spring. Aero Engr 499C Independent Study - Sem hrs: 1 Fall or Spring.

U.S. Air Force Academy, USAFA, CO 80840, (719) 333-1110 DSN: 333-1110, Updated: 22 Dec 14
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